Disabilities List

What does Canada Revenue Agency define a disability as?

Below is a list of possible disabilities that Care Benefit Services goes by as classified by Canada Revenue Agency. These classifications are both explicit & indistinct which is why our agents will sit with you and go through with all the factors of the disability involved in your case to ensure higher chances of your application for DTC.

Click here to speak to one of our highly trained agents today to get started on your DTC.


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Addictions

An addiction is an obsession, compulsion, or excessive psychological dependence, such as: drug addiction (e.g. alcoholism, nicotine addiction), problem gambling, compulsive overeating, television addiction, etc.
In medicine, an addiction is a chronic neurobiological disorder that has genetic, psychosocial, and environmental dimensions and is characterized by one of the following: the continued use of a substance despite its detrimental effects, compulsive behavior, and preoccupation with a drug's use for non-therapeutic purposes. 
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ADHD Combined Type

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a condition that can make it hard for a person to sit still, control behavior, and pay attention. These difficulties usually begin before the person is 7 years old. However, these behaviors may not be noticed until the child is older. Doctors believe that some people with AD/HD do not have enough of certain chemicals (calledneurotransmitters) in their brain. These chemicals help the brain control behavior. 
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ADHD Primarily Hyperactive/ Impulsive

Impulsive behaviors and inappropriate movement (fidgeting, inability to keep still) or restlessness are the primary problems. Unlike the inattentive ADHD-type child, this individual is more often the "class clown" or "class devil" -- either representation leads to recurrent disruptive problems. 
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ADHD Primarily Inattentive

The child has recurrent inattentiveness and inability to maintain focus on tasks or activities. In the classroom, this may be the child who is "spacing out" and "can't stay on track." 
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Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is a condition where the sufferer becomes anxious in environments that are unfamiliar or where he or she perceives that they have little control. Triggers for this anxiety may include wide open spaces, crowds (social anxiety), or traveling (even short distances). Agoraphobia is often, but not always, compounded by a fear of social embarrassment, as the agoraphobic fears the onset of a panic attack and appearing distraught in public. 
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Alcoholic

An alcoholic is a person who suffers from alcoholism - the body is dependent on alcohol. An alcoholic is addicted to alcohol. Alcoholism is a chronic (long-term) disease. People who suffer from alcoholism are obsessed with alcohol and cannot control how much they consume, even if it is causing serious problems at home, work and financially. 
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Alzheimer’s Disease


Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive and fatal brain disease. As many as 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer's destroys brain cells, causing memory loss and problems with thinking and behavior severe enough to affect work, lifelong hobbies or social life. Alzheimer’s gets worse over time, and it is fatal. 
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a form of motor neuron disease. The disorder causes muscle weakness and atrophy throughout the body as both the upper and lower motor neurons degenerate, ceasing to send messages to muscles. Unable to function, the muscles gradually weaken, develop fasciculations (twitches) because of denervation, and eventually atrophy because of that denervation. The patient may ultimately lose the ability to initiate and control all voluntary movement. 
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Angina

Angina is chest pain or discomfort that occurs when an area of your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood. Angina may feel like pressure or squeezing in your chest. The pain also may occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. It is a symptom of an underlying heart disease. 
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Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by extremely low body weight, distorted body image and an obsessive fear of gaining weight. 
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Antisocial personality disorder

Antisocial Personality Disorder is a condition characterized by persistent disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. Deceit and manipulation are central features of this disorder.
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Anxiety

Anxiety is a psychological and physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components.[2] These components combine to create an unpleasant feeling that is typically associated with uneasiness, fear, or worry.
Anxiety is a generalized mood condition that occurs without an identifiable triggering stimulus. As such, it is distinguished from fear, which occurs in the presence of an observed threat. 
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Arthiritis

Arthritis means inflammation of a joint. There are more than one hundred different forms of arthritis. They are similar to each other in the symptoms they produce, which includes sore, stiff, inflamed, and painful joints.
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Asperger’s Syndrome

Asperger syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder, and people with it show significant difficulties in social interaction, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. People with Asperger’s Syndrome are not able to pick up on social cues and may lack inborn social skills, such as being able to read others' body language, start or maintain a conversation, and take turns talking.
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Ataxia

Ataxia is a disease in which a person experiences incoordination and unsteadiness due to the brain's failure to regulate the body's posture and regulate the strength and direction of limb movements. Ataxia is usually a consequence of disease in the brain.
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Auditory Processing Disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder affects up to 5% of school-aged children. These students cannot process the information they hear and are usually characterized as “poor listeners.” They have normal hearing ability, but there is a disconnect between what is heard and what is understood.
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Autism

Children with autism often have extreme difficulty developing normal relationships with others. They tend not to share in the interests their peers have. In many cases these children are not able to interpret non-verbal cues of communication like facial expressions. Most people with autism have some impairment in language and many never speak at all.
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Behçet's Disease

Behcet's disease is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder marked by eye inflammation, oral and genital ulcers, and certain other skin lesions, as well as varying, multisystem involvement including the joints, blood vessels, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms include inflammation of the uvea, the middle coat of the eye comprising the choroid, ciliary body, and the iris with genital and oral ulcers.
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Bi- Polar Disorder

Bipolar disorder causes serious shifts in mood, energy, thinking, and behavior–from the highs of mania on one extreme, to the lows of depression on the other. More than just a fleeting good or bad mood, the cycles of bipolar disorder last for days, weeks, or months. And unlike ordinary mood swings, the mood changes of bipolar disorder are so intense that they interfere with your ability to function.
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Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a personality disorder described as a prolonged disturbance of personality function in a person over the age of eighteen years, characterized by depth and variability of moods. The disorder typically involves unusual levels of instability in mood, chaotic and unstable interpersonal relationships, self-image, identity, and behavior; as well as a disturbance in the individual's sense of self.
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Bulimia Nervosa

Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent binge eating, followed by compensatory behaviors. The most common form is defensive vomiting, sometimes called purging, fasting, the use of laxatives, enemas, diuretics, and over exercising are also common.
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Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a term used to describe a group of chronic disorders impairing control of movement. These disorders are not caused by problems in the muscles or nerves outside the brain. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupts the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture.
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Chromosome Abnormality

Chromosome abnormalities are problems that exist in the genetic structure of a baby's chromosomes. Also referred to as chromosome disorders, these abnormalities can appear in different ways in your baby. Typically, chromosomal abnormalities cause abnormal physical appearance though they can also cause delayed mental development.
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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a condition causing persistent fatigue that lasts for at least six months (or longer) and isn't due to another medical condition. CFS is about two to four times more common in women than in men. It is associated with extreme and prolonged fatigue that isn't relieved by rest. People with CFS experience persistent tiredness so severe that it prevents them from working, exercising, and enjoying life.
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Chronic Pain Disorder

Chronic pain syndrome consists of chronic anxiety and depression, anger, and changed lifestyle, all with a variable but significant level of genuine neurologically based pain. Pain signals keep firing in the nervous system for weeks, months, even years.
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Colitis

Colitis refers to an inflammation of the colon and is often used to describe an inflammation of the large intestine. Symptoms of colitis may include: abdominal pain, anorexia (loss of appetite), fatigue, diarrhea, cramping, urgency and bloating.
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Conduct Disorder

Conduct disorder is a psychiatric category marked by a pattern of repetitive behavior wherein the rights of others or social norms are violated. Symptoms include verbal and physical aggression, cruel behavior toward people and pets, destructive behavior, lying, truancy, vandalism, and stealing.
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Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease, also called coronary heart disease, is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the coronary arteries. These arteries supply your heart muscle with oxygen-rich blood. Symptoms of this is chest pain, squeezing in the chest, and shortness of breath.
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Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

Cri du chat syndrome is a group of symptoms that result when a piece of chromosomal material is missing from a particular region on chromosome 5. Children born with this chromosomal deletion have a characteristic mewing cat-like cry as infants that is thought to be caused by abnormal development of the larynx (organ in the throat responsible for voice production). They also have unusual facial features, poor muscle tone, small head size, and mental retardation.
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Crohn’s Disease

Crohn's Disease (CD) is an inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It affects the ileum (small intestine) and the colon (large intestine) in most cases, but can occur in any section of the GI tract from the mouth to the anus. Symptoms include, abdominal pain or cramping, diarrhea, fever, fatigue, weight loss, an abnormal opening at or near the anus, and a a painful crack in the mucous membrane of the anus.
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De Vivo Disease

A rare metabolic disorder 
involving a deficiency of a molecule needed to transport glucose. The glucose is unable to be transported from the blood and into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms include, infantile, seizures, delayed development, small head, sudden confusion, sleep disturbance, learning disability and mental retardation.
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Dementia



Dementia is a brain disorder with permanent loss of memory or other higher cognitive function. Dementia can either be progressive, such as in Alzheimer's disease, or may remain stable, as can be seen after a stroke or head injury. Symptoms include, Loss of memory and inability to perform routine tasks, difficulties in job performance, language problems, and behavioral changes.
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Depression

Depression is a "whole-body" illness, involving your body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way you eat and sleep, the way you feel about yourself, and the way you think about things. People with depression have sleeping problems, appetite disorders, fatigue, loss of energy, and decreased concentration.
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Developmentally Delayed

A developmental delay is any significant lag in a child's physical, cognitive, behavioral, emotional, or social development, in comparison with norms. The symptoms of this is when the child does not meet expected developmental milestones in communication, movement, social or self-help skills.
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Dissociative Identity Disorder

Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a mental illness that involves the sufferer experiencing at least two clear identities or personality states, each of which has a fairly consistent way of viewing and relating to the world. Symptoms include, fluctuating symptom pictures, severe headaches or pains, time distortions, and depersonalization.
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Down Syndrome

Down syndrome is a combination of birth defects, including some degree of mental retardation and characteristic facial features. A child with down syndrome may have eyes that slant upward and small ears that may fold over a little at the top. The mouth may be small, making the tongue appear large. The nose also may be small, with a flattened nasal bridge. Some babies with down syndrome have short necks and small hands with short fingers.
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Dressing

People with the Dressing disability are not able to dress themselves, and need assistance. Or these people take a significantly long time to dress themselves.
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Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is a deficiency in the ability to write by hand, regardless of the ability to read, not a result of intellectual impairment. People with dysgraphia usually can write on some level, and often lack other fine motor skills, finding tasks such as tying shoes difficult. It often does not affect all fine motor skills. They can also lack basic spelling skills (for example, having difficulties with the letters p, q, b, and d), and often will write the wrong word when trying to formulate thoughts.
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Elimination

Elimination disorders are disorders that concern the elimination of feces or urine from the body. The causes of these disorders may be medical or psychiatric. Symptoms include repeatedly having bowel movements in inappropriate places after the age when bowel control is normally expected or releasing of urine into bedding, clothing, or other inappropriate places.
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Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures.These seizures are transient signs and/or symptoms of abnormal, excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain.
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Feeding

The feeding disorder does not allow people to feed themselves without difficulty. Or it takes these people a significantly long for these people to feed themselves.
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE) are conditions associated with drinking alcohol during pregnancy. FAS causes a variety of mental, physical, and developmental disabilities in the baby. Symptoms include, central nervous systems abnormalities, a particular pattern of facial features, and a slower than average growth.
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Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain and allodynia, a heightened and painful response to pressure. Symptoms include increased sensitivity to pain, and fatigue.
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Gambling Addiction

A gambling addiction is an urge to gamble desptie the neagtive consequences or a desire to stop. This disability can be diagnosed if the patient meets specific criteria. Gambling is considered to be an impulse control disorder and needs clinical assistance in order to protect the individual and his family from harm.
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Gender Identity Disorder

A person with gender identity disorder is a person who strongly identifies with the other sex. They may identify with the opposite sex to the point of believing that they are opposite sex and are trapped in the wrong body. This causes the person to experience discomfort with his/her biological sex orientation.
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Generalized Anxiety Disorder

It is an axienty disorder characterized by chronic anxiety, exaggerated worry and tension, although there is nothing or little to provoke it. People with generalized anxiety disorder can't seem to shake their concerns. Their worries are accompanied by physical symptoms, especially fatigue, headaches, muscle tension, muscle aches, difficulty swallowing, trembling, twitching, irritability, sweating, and hot flashes.
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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve. Damage usually occurs as a result of elevated pressure of the fluid (aqueous humor) in the eye. This damage results in gradual visual changes and then loss of vision.
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Global Developmental Delay

Global Developmental Delay is a term used to describe a condition that occurs during the developmental period of a child's life. It is usually characterized by lower intellectual functioning and is accompanied by significant limitations. Symptoms include, delayed acquisition of milestones: the child is late in sitting up, crawling, walking, limited reasoning or conceptual abilities, fine/gross motor difficulties, poor social skills/judgment, aggressive behaviour as a coping skill, and communication problems.
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Hearing

People with a hearing disability are unable to hear sound. Or it takes these people significantly longer to hearing what the other person is saying.
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Heart Attack / Bypass

If the heart muscle does not have enough blood (and consequently oxygen) it dies and a heart attack occurs. A heart attack is the process whereby an area of dead tissue of the heart muscle which is caused by a loss of blood supply.
A bypass or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a type of surgery called revascularisation, used to improve blood flow to the heart in people with severe coronary artery disease (CAD).
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Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a specific type of virus that may cause the clinical disease called hepatitis. Hepatitis (literally, inflammation of the liver) can be caused by many drugs, toxic agents, numerous viruses, autoimmune disease, and genetic disorders. Eighty percent of those infected do not have symptoms. Some people feel like they have the flu. Symptoms of hepatitis C can include fatigue, decreased appetite, nausea, jaundice, fever, and an enlarged liver.
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Huntington’s Disease

Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited progressive disorder of the brain that leads to uncontrolled movements, emotional instability, and loss of intellectual faculties. The first signs of HD may be subtle - a tic here, a twitch there, unexplained fluctuations of mood, an awareness of becoming more clumsy, depressed, or irritable than usual. There is a slurring and slowing of speech. The effects of the disease are grim. As the disease progresses, the brain-cell death that is the basis of symptoms continues.
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Hypermobility Syndrome

A genetic connective tissue disorder involving a defect of chromosome. Symptoms include, tallness, thinness, skeletal abnormalities, eye abnormalities, heart abnormalities, and nervous system problems.
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Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone deficiency. It can be due to primary disease of the thyroid gland itself or to the lack of stimulation of the thyroid gland by the pituitary gland via the hormone TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Hypothyroidism overwhelmingly afflicts women, (four times more often than men), especially those women between the ages of 35 and 60. Symptoms include, low energy, depression, dizziness, weight gain, intolerance to cold, inability to concentrate, constipation, slowed heart rate, infertility, and more.
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Hypotonia

Hypotonia means low tone, and refers to a physiological state in which a muscle has decreased tone, or tension. A muscle's tone is a measure of its ability to resist passive elongation or stretching. It is most often seen in newborns (congenital) and infants, but it may persist through adolescence into adulthood. Another name for infantile hypotonia is floppy baby syndrome. This refers to the tendency of a hypotonic infant's arms, legs, and head to flop, or dangle loosely, when they are picked up or moved.
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Infantile Spasms

Infantile spasms (IS) are seizures seen in epilepsy of infancy and early childhood. The typical pattern of an infantile spasm occurs soon after arousal from sleep, and involves a sudden bending forward and stiffening of the body, arms, and legs.
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Irritable Bowel syndrome (IBS)

Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder characterized most commonly by cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. IBS causes a great deal of discomfort and distress, but it does not permanently harm the intestines and does not lead to a serious disease, such as cancer. Most people can control their symptoms with diet, stress management, and prescribed medications.
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Kidney or Renal Failure

The kidneys undergo cellular death and are unable to filter wastes, produce urine and maintain fluid balances. This dysfunction causes a built up of toxins in the body which can affect the blood, brain and heart, as well as other complications.
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Learning Disabilities

Learning disability, is a disorder in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner, usually caused by an unknown factor or factors. The unknown factor is the disorder that affects the brain's ability to receive and process information. This disorder can make it problematic for a person to learn as quickly or in the same way as someone who isn't affected by a learning disability.
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Mania

Mania is a state of abnormally elevated or irritable mood, arousal, and/ or energy levels. There are several possible causes for mania outside of mood disorders, including drug abuse and brain tumors.
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Mental Retardation

Mental retardation is a generalized disorder, characterized by significantly impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in two or more adaptive behaviors with onset before the age of 18.
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Microcephaly

Microcephaly is a disorder in which the circumference of the head is more than two standard deviations smaller than average for the person's age and sex.
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Migraine

Migraines are characterized by altered bodily perceptions, such as severe headaches, and nausea.
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Mild Intellectual disability

Mild Intllectual disability is a generalized disorder, characterized by significantly impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in two or more adaptive behaviors with onset before the age of 18. Also known as mental retardation.
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Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a disease in which the fatty myelin sheaths around the axons of the brain and spinal cord are damaged, leading to demyelination and scarring.
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Myotonic Myopathy

Myotonic dystrophy is a chronic, slowly progressing, highly variable inherited multisystemic disease. It is characterized by wasting of the muscles, cataracts, heart conduction defects, endocrine changes, and myotonia. Myotonic dystrophy can occur in patients of any age.
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Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts that produce anxiety, by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing anxiety, or by combinations of such thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions).
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Oppositional defiant disorder

Oppositional defiant disorder is an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behavior toward authority figures which goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behavior. People who have it may appear very stubborn.
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Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, is a group of diseases and mechanical abnormalities involving degradation of joints, including articular cartilage and the subchondral bone> next to it.
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Panic Disorder

Panic disorder is an anxiety disorder characterized by recurring severe panic attacks. It may also include significant behavioral change lasting at least a month and of ongoing worry about the implications or concern about having other attacks.
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Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs the sufferer's motor skills, speech, and other functions. Parkinson's disease belongs to a group of conditions called movement disorders. It is characterized by muscle rigidity, tremor, a slowing of physical movement and a loss of physical movement in extreme cases.
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Personality disorder

Personality disorders, formerly referred to as character disorders, are a class of personality types and behaviors that defines as an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the culture of the individual who exhibits it.
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Pervasive developmental disorder

Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), as opposed to specific developmental disorders (SDD), refers to a group of five disorders characterized by delays in the development of multiple basic functions including socialization and communication.
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Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat.
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Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe muscle weakness, feeding difficulties and failure to thrive in early infancy, followed in later infancy by uncontrolled appetite and severe obesity. All patients have some degree of mental retardation and behavior problems are common. In addition, PWS patients show short stature, small hands and feet and undescended testes in males.
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Psychotic

Psychosis is abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a "loss of contact with reality". People suffering from psychosis are said to be psychotic. People experiencing psychosis may report hallucinations or delusional beliefs, and may exhibit personality changes and thought disorder. This may be accompanied by unusual or bizarre behavior, as well as difficulty with social interaction and impairment in carrying out the daily life activities.
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Quadrapallegic

Quadriplegia, also known as tetraplegia, is paralysis caused by illness or injury to a human that results in the partial or total loss of use of all of their limbs and torso; paraplegia is similar but does not affect the arms. The loss is usually sensory and motor, which means both sensation and control are lost.
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Retinoschisis

Retinoschisis is an eye disease characterized by the abnormal splitting of the retina's neurosensory layers, usually in the outer plexiform layer, resulting in a loss of vision in the corresponding visual field in some rarer forms.
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Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe, and disabling brain disorder. People with schizophrenia sometimes hear voices others don’t hear, believe that others are broadcasting their thoughts to the world, or become convinced that others are plotting to harm them. These experiences can make them fearful and withdrawn and cause difficulties when they try to have relationships with others.
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Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person's spine is curved from side to side. Instead of the spine being a straight line it looks more like "C" or "S" in a x-ray.
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Seizure Disorder

In seizure disorders, the brain's electrical activity is periodically disturbed, resulting in some degree of temporary brain disfunction. Many people have unusual sensations just before a seizure starts. Some seizures cause uncontrollable shaking and loss of consciousness, but more often, people simply stop moving or become unaware of what is happening.
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Shopaholic

Shopaholics are individuals who can't control their spending. The difference between an ordinary spender and a spendaholic is that for a spendaholic, one purchase leads to another and the thrill of buying often outweighs consideration for the consequences of overspending that follows. For spendaholics, overspending becomes an addiction, one that is very hard to overcome.
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Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Each pause lasts long enough so that one or more breaths are missed, and such episodes occur repeatedly throughout sleep.The standard pause is a  minimum of 10 second intervals between breaths.
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Sleep disorder

A sleep disorder is a medical disorder of the sleep patterns of a person or animal. Some sleep disorders are serious enough to interfere with normal physical, mental and emotional functioning.
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Speaking

One is not able to speak or takes a long amount of time to speak.
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Specific developmental disorder (SDD)

Specific developmental disorders categorizes specific learning disabilities and developmental disorders affecting coordination. Disorders like one is not able to read and write, or one has difficulty in speaking or showing expressions.
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Stroke

A stroke is the rapidly developing loss of brain function(s) due to disturbance in the blood supply to the brain. This can be due to lack of glucose and oxygen supply.
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Substance Abuse

Substance abuse refers to the use or addiction of a drug or other chemical leading to effects that are harmful to the individual's physical and mental health, or the welfare of others. The disorder is characterized by a pattern of continued bad use of a medication, this results in repeated adverse social consequences related to drug use, such as failure to meet work.
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Tic disorder

Tic disorders are characterized by the persistent presence of tics, which are abrupt, repetitive involuntary movements and sounds that have been described as caricatures of normal physical acts.
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Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome is an inherited neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by the presence of multiple physical (motor) tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic; these tics characteristically wax and wane. Tourette's is defined as part of a spectrum of tic disorders, which includes transient and chronic tics.
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Tumor

A tumor is the name for a swelling or lesion formed by an abnormal growth of cells (termed neoplastic). Tumor is not synonymous with cancer. A tumor can be benign, pre-malignant or malignant, where as cancer is by definition malignant.
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Vision

When one is blind in both eyes, 20/200 or 20 degrees field of vision.
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Walking

One can't walk 100 metres or takes significantly longer to walk that distance.
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